‘Very good and very colourful’: Monster Party

Today is Indigenous Literacy Day – a national celebration of Indigenous culture, stories, language and literacy. It’s also the day that The Indigenous Literacy Fund is especially encouraging the rest of Australia to raise funds and advocate for more equal access to literacy resources for remote communities. It kicks off a month of fundraising to literally fill the bookshelves of children in remote communities who otherwise have little access to books. There’s a number of different ways you can do your bit, so head over to their website to learn more.

Today is also the day that Master Seven and I read Monster Party, a book illustrated by kids from the Rawa Community School situated in the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia. This is a gorgeous book – the pages are really vibrant and the illustrations are so beautifully textured they seem almost three-dimensional. The authors and students have produced a delightful book.

Read on to see my penetrating questions, and Master Seven’s incisive answers about the fabulous book Monster Party.

Andy Griffiths & Terry Denton: Reigning supreme with Aussie kids

We’d been waiting for this moment for months.  And when I say ‘we‘, I don’t just mean ‘them‘, I mean me and him too.

Master Six and Master Nearly-Eight have read all the Storey Treehouse books, several times over. We’ve listened to them as audiobooks, several times over. They’ve written their own books (or started them anyway) that bear such a resemblance to the Griffiths’ pencraft that copyright is, categorically, an issue. In short, we LOVE the Griffiths/ Denton duo.  And last night we were there in the Melbourne Town Hall, thanks to tickets bought months and months ago, to witness the launch of the next sacred installment – The 91-Storey Treehouse.

The book launch was as chaotic as it was charming. It was improvised, and silly. But it had every child in the house on the edge on their seats. Literally.

‘The people who drew the pictures are very good drawers’, pronounces Master Six

It’s Master Six’s birthday today (with fever-pitched excitement in this household!). Master Seven will turn into Master Eight in a few weeks time. It’s irrefutable; they’re growing up.

Notwithstanding their rapid ageing, as well as stiff competition from the likes of Captain Underpants and the Storey Treehouse series, both boys still love reading picture books. Although, it’s not guaranteed that every picture book will capture their imagination as might’ve been the case even a year ago.  With this in mind, we recently tested the waters with Mrs White and the Red Desert and On the Way to Nana’s House.

Master Six and Master Nearly-Eight give their considered opinions on these two books: their covers, storylines, illustrations, and as well as delivering an ultimate verdict on both books.

The Perfect Excuse for a Cuddle: At the Zoo I See

Master Five just started school in February and without being too melancholy, I realise that the time will come when he’ll stop following me around the house with a pile of picture books asking to sit on my knee and to read together. So I’m consciously trying to take these moments when I can.

In a hygge-inspired snuggle, we recently spent a lovely twenty minutes together reading At the Zoo I See, a beautiful picture book by Joshua Button, a young author descended from the Walmajarri people of the East Kimberley.